Glacier National Park

 
Written by Travel & Daily Life Staff |
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Glacier National Park, in the Rocky Mountains of northwestern Montana, established by act of Congress May 11, 1910, contains 981,681 acres, or 1,534 square miles, of the finest mountain country in America. Nestled among the higher peaks are more than 60 glaciers and 200 beautiful lakes. During the summer months it is possible to visit most of the glaciers and many of the lakes with relatively little difficulty. Horseback and foot trails penetrate almost all sections of the park. Conveniently located trail camps, operated at a reasonable cost, make it possible for visitors to enjoy the mountain scenery without having to carry food and camping equipment. Many travelers hike or ride through the mountains for days at a time, resting each evening at one of these high mountain camps. The glaciers found in the park are among the few in the United States which are easily accessible.

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Author: Travel & Daily Life Staff
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